Unethical Recruiting Tactics to Avoid

As with any career, you must start somewhere. Your first step as a neophyte recruiter could begin anywhere: with an agency, at the corporate level, or focusing purely on college students. Either way, despite a lack of experience, it’s critical to know what’s ethical and what’s not in your sales process.

Regardless of where you are, your name is your brand. Your brand is your career and unless you plan on changing your full name, your recruiting decisions can affect you for the rest of your working life.

Even during desperate times like a recession, you need to understand and maintain the premise that it’s your responsibility to employ the most effective and moral ways to source candidates. Otherwise you’ll discover that word spreads all too quickly about the sleazy recruiter. Searching for talent is no easy task, but cutting corners is no excuse and you need to ensure that your lead generation system is kosher.

In next week’s blog post, we take a closer look at 5 unethical, deceptive (and unfortunately effective) recruiting tactics that would never be found in a best practices manual. These include:

– Rusing
– Re-Directing
– Double Rusing
– Red Herring
– Invisible Job Descriptions

Stay tuned,
Vic

Victor Mahillon
Victor Mahillon
Director of Recruiting

Victor Mahillon is the Director of Recruiting at Kamcord. Previously he was a Talent manager at OpenView.
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