Adam Marcus

Managing Partner

While Adam’s mother always thought of him as a stockbroker and his family constantly pitches him great ideas – like putting ads on airplane tray tables – he actually invests in expansion stage software companies with a focus on vertical SaaS and mobile-first technologies.

He currently sits on the boards of Instructure (NYSE: INST), which went public in 2015, VTS, Signpost, Kareo, Spredfast, Monetate, FieldAware, Instant.ly (acquired by SSI) and UnBoundID (acquired by Ping Identity). He has a real passion for working with entrepreneurs who are disrupting large markets long dominated by clunky incumbents.

Prior to OpenView, Adam worked at Battery Ventures where he served as a Board Observer for ExactTarget (NYSE: ET), ultimately acquired by Salesforce.com (NYSE: CRM) for $2.7B, and was involved with Cortera and J. Hillburn, the latter of which he seed funded. Previously, Adam served as Director of Corporate Development for the Boston Celtics and was a manager at Gamesville.com, later acquired by Lycos (acquired for $12B by Telefonica). He started his career working in product at one of the first social networks, Tripod which was acquired by Lycos during the first internet bubble (guess we sold early).

Adam is active in social entrepreneurship and sits on the Board of Compass Working Capital, which helps low-income families become financially secure. He is also a founding member of the First Growth Venture Network where he serves on the Executive Committee. Adam has been a long-time advisor to and supporter of Grassroots Soccer, a nonprofit working to eradicate AIDS in Africa.

Get to Know Adam

When Adam’s not working, he’s usually chasing around his two young children, cooking, running and volunteering his time helping single mothers support their financial dreams.

What Does OpenView Mean to You?

Building a venture firm isn’t as hard as building a company but man it’s hard. I am very thankful for the entrepreneurs who chose and continue to choose OpenView, particularly in the early days when we were easily confused with a HP product line.